Posts related to “Poverty Interrupted”

Return to Blog.

From WIC to SNAP: Benefits Programs Go Farther with Behavioral Science

Jul 18, 2017 by ideas42

In the United States, more than 45 million people live below the poverty line, including one in five children who will experience its long-lasting effects. While public benefits programs meaningfully impact countless lives by providing essentials like food and health care, many people who are struggling do not receive these benefits for a variety of … Read more.

Creating Slack: Poverty Interrupted

Sep 22, 2015

This post is part of a series about Poverty Interrupted, ideas42’s groundbreaking effort to bring a behavioral science approach to the problem of intergenerational poverty. Imagine that your car is having some trouble and it will cost $150 in service to take care of the problem. Unfortunately, your insurance will only cover 10% of this … Read more.

Cut the Costs: Poverty Interrupted

Jul 8, 2015

For the 45.3 million Americans who struggle to cover basic expenses, living in poverty is costly in terms of time, money, and cognition. Recent research by two of ideas42’s cofounders gives a name to the cognitive costs of poverty: a bandwidth tax, levied by the experience of scarcity. They find that lacking a key resource, … Read more.

Breaking New Ground in the Fight Against Poverty

May 21, 2015

“If you don’t have money, if you don’t come from money, then your whole life is a struggle.” Though Mark* said this with a smile, we sensed his exhaustion. He spoke lovingly of his 3-year-old daughter and 1-year-old son, but explained that it was difficult to balance looking after his family with complicated work schedules. … Read more.

Fighting Intergenerational Poverty

Sep 17, 2014

It’s easy to agree that poverty is a problem, but explaining its causes and prescribing solutions is a far more difficult and complex task. What if children born into poverty could become as likely to succeed as their wealthier peers? What if intergenerational poverty were not an unavoidable and enduring evil, but entirely tractable? These … Read more.