Economic Prosperity

Could Temporary, Behaviorally Informed Changes to WIC Be Program Fixtures?

by Antonia Violante & Allison Yates-Berg

Since the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic, millions of people have lost their jobs or are finding it even harder to stretch their paycheck to meet their needs. Many are finding that they need social safety net programs to ensure the health and well-being of their families, often for the first time. One of these […]

ideas42 Stands for Racial Justice

by ideas42

We are disgusted by the murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery. We are angry about the ongoing racism faced by Black people. This anger is not new in the US, as Black Americans have faced a long history of racist violence driven not by a few bad actors, but by systemic racism […]

Doing More with Less: Behavioral Insights for Humanitarian Cash and Vouchers

by Meghann Perez, Senior Associate, ideas42 & Holly Welcome Radice, Cash and Markets Technical Advisor, CARE

Cash and voucher assistance changed humanitarian response forever. In 2015, the High Level Panel on Cash Transfers directed humanitarian agencies  to implement unconditional cash transfers at scale whenever possible, and the advice was heeded. Preliminary findings suggest an estimated 60 percent scale-up of total cash and voucher delivery from 2016 to 2018—from US$2 billion in […]

Making Government COVID-19 Communications More Effective

by Rebecca Oran & Octavio Medina

This is part of a series of posts about behavioral science and COVID-19. Click here to read about some of the most important behaviors during this pandemic—like seeking medical help, responding to humanitarian crises, and adapting to remote work in a global outbreak. Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, many public benefits programs in the United […]

Behavioral Design for Public Agencies’ COVID-19 Response

by Rachel Rosenberg

This is part of a series of posts about behavioral science and COVID-19. Click here to read about some of the most important behaviors during this pandemic—like seeking medical help, responding to humanitarian crises, and adapting to remote work in a global outbreak. Across the country, tens of thousands of new cases of COVID-19 are reported every […]

Resources for Making Financial Supports Behaviorally Informed During a Crisis

by Katy Davis & Manasee Desai

This is part of a series of posts about behavioral science and COVID-19. Click here to read about some of the most important behaviors during this pandemic—like seeking medical help, responding to humanitarian crises, and adapting to remote work in a global outbreak. You’d be forgiven if you overlooked that April is Financial Literacy Month, […]

When Panic Buying Hurts: Strategies to Lessen the Impact on WIC Participants

by Rebecca Oran

This is part of a series of posts on behavioral science and COVID-19. Click here to read about some of the most important behaviors during this pandemic—like healthy distancing and seeking medical help, and responding to humanitarian crises in a global outbreak. Social distancing guidelines in the U.S. have been extended through the end of April as a […]

Public Charge Rule Update: Still Pure Sludge, Now in Effect

by Jeremy Barofsky

Note: this is a timely update to a post about the policy implications of the sludge-filled public charge rule change. Click here to read the original post and view our analysis. On February 24, the federal government’s new “public charge” rule took effect after the U.S. Supreme Court overruled a temporary nationwide injunction blocking implementation of […]

Behavioral Science and the Census: Getting out the Count in NYC

by Julia Anderson and Laura Wolff

Each decade, the government makes an effort to count every person living in the United States. The census is absolutely essential to making government programs and services work as effectively as possible. For example, census data are used to determine the amount of federal funding for hundreds of programs – from Medicaid and student loans […]

How Can Behavioral Science Help People Find Decent Work?

by Jessica Jean-Francois

Aside from providing us with wages and spending power, work is a vehicle for social cohesion, aspirations for growth and a feeling of self-worth. In a world where 95% of the total labor force is technically employed, it can be hard to believe that as many as 300 million people have paid work but live […]

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